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Just PropertyVolume Two: Enlightenment, Revolution, and History$
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Christopher Pierson

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199673292

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199673292.001.0001

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The German Enlightenment—and Beyond

The German Enlightenment—and Beyond

Chapter:
(p.70) 3 The German Enlightenment—and Beyond
Source:
Just Property
Author(s):

Christopher Pierson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199673292.003.0004

A critical guide to key innovations in property thinking in the most important figures of the German Enlightenment is provided in the third chapter, exclusively through the work of three key thinkers: Immanuel Kant, Gottlieb Fichte, and Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel. They are concerned with the existence of private property as an expression of our (individual) will and with the consequent ‘rightness’ of the overall property regime. This leads them to focus much more intently upon the sort of state which we can be required to join in order to make our property relationships ‘rightful’. In the case of Fichte in particular, this leads to some fairly formidable constraints on a legitimate regime of private property.

Keywords:   German Enlightenment, Kant, Fichte, Hegel, will, state

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