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How Matter MattersObjects, Artifacts, and Materiality in Organization Studies$
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Paul R. Carlile, Davide Nicolini, Ann Langley, and Haridimos Tsoukas

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199671533

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199671533.001.0001

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Knowledge Eclipse: Producing Sociomaterial Reconfigurations in the Hospitality Sector

Knowledge Eclipse: Producing Sociomaterial Reconfigurations in the Hospitality Sector

Chapter:
(p.119) 6 Knowledge Eclipse: Producing Sociomaterial Reconfigurations in the Hospitality Sector
Source:
How Matter Matters
Author(s):

Wanda J. Orlikowski

Susan V. Scott

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199671533.003.0006

Drawing on a field study of the travel site TripAdvisor, the authors explore how online reviewing, rating, and ranking mechanisms are overshadowing traditional configurations of knowledge in the hospitality sector by redistributing resources, shifting practices and habitats, and redefining what counts, who counts, and how. The authors suggest that such sociomaterial reconfigurations offer important insights into the broader issues associated with the role of social media in knowledge practices, and the ways in which expert valuation schemes are being eclipsed by ones grounded in user-generated content. They maintain that these different valuation schemes entail different kinds of work, producing different valuations of the real, and enacting different (singular and multiple) realities. As such, these reconfigurations of valuation raise not just important epistemological issues but also critical questions of ontology and accountability.

Keywords:   social media, knowledge, valuation, ranking mechanisms, user-generated content, sociomaterial practice

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