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International Relations Since the End of the Cold WarNew and Old Dimensions$
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Geir Lundestad

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199666430

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199666430.001.0001

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Conclusion: The Future

Conclusion: The Future

Chapter:
(p.290) Conclusion: The Future
Source:
International Relations Since the End of the Cold War
Author(s):

Geir Lundestad

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199666430.003.0016

In the conclusion the editor argues that the relative position of the United States is going to become weaker and that of China stronger. Still, in the near future China is going to remain a relatively poor country, with a weaker defense than the United States, and with many fewer allies than the US is going to have. This combination of Chinese strength and US relative weakness will make for a world with weaker leadership than the US has provided in recent decades. Globalization is going to continue, particularly at the technological level, less at the political level, where the nation state is likely to remain the basic unit. At the moral level the editor argues that there has been very significant improvement in the world: fewer wars, more democracy, and less poverty. These improvements are likely to continue.

Keywords:   the United States, China, globalization, fragmentation, democracy, poverty, better world

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