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Handbook of Cannabis$
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Roger Pertwee

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199662685

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199662685.001.0001

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Cannabis Horticulture

Cannabis Horticulture

Chapter:
(p.65) Chapter 4 Cannabis Horticulture
Source:
Handbook of Cannabis
Author(s):

David John Potter

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199662685.003.0004

Of the many plants used by the pharmaceutical industry, cannabis is perhaps the only major one grown indoors. This provides extra security and enables GW Pharma to repeatedly grow batches of phytopharmaceutical feedstock of the high quality needed to produce a botanical drug like Sativex®. This multicomponent medicine contains a range of secondary metabolites, including the cannabinoids. By growing the plants in optimized uniform conditions, as outlined here, a consistent ratio of ingredients can be achieved. This chapter describes the morphology of the cannabis plant with specific emphasis on the trichomes, which produce the pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites. The possible natural function of these trichomes is debated. The growth of the plant in a natural outdoor setting, and in an indoor controlled environment, is compared, and newly emerging autoflowering plants described. The effect of contrasting growing conditions on plant morphology and secondary metabolite content is discussed.

Keywords:   trichome, cannabinoid, secondary metabolite, phytopharmaceutical, botanical drug, autoflowering

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