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The Theory of Materials Failure$
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Richard M. Christensen

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199662111

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199662111.001.0001

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Defining Yield Stress and Failure Stress (Strength)

Defining Yield Stress and Failure Stress (Strength)

Chapter:
(p.118) 9 Defining Yield Stress and Failure Stress (Strength)
Source:
The Theory of Materials Failure
Author(s):

Richard M. Christensen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199662111.003.0009

Definitions of yield stress and failure stress (strength) have always been subject to great variations in understanding and implementation. There is no agreement on the proper definitions of these properties that are needed for the use of failure criteria. There are only individual preferences that usually are not even stated when reporting data-derived properties. Rational definitions are derived for both the yield stress and the failure stress. The yield stress definition is that of the stress at which the second derivative of the stress versus strain attains a maximum. Unfortunately this definition is difficult to implement from typical testing data, so an approximation is derived in an “offset” form. The failure-stress definition is specified in terms of some energy characteristics that are easily found from the stress–strain curves. Both definitions for yield stress and failure stress can be used with the failure criteria derived from relevant failure theories.

Keywords:   yield stress, failure stress, strength, stress–strain, energy, failure criteria

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