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Intellectual Property RightsLegal and Economic Challenges for Development$
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Mario Cimoli, Giovanni Dosi, Keith E. Maskus, Ruth L. Okediji, and Jerome H. Reichman

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199660759

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199660759.001.0001

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The Distributive Impact of Intellectual Property Regimes: A Report from the “Natural Experiment” of the Green Revolution1

The Distributive Impact of Intellectual Property Regimes: A Report from the “Natural Experiment” of the Green Revolution1

Chapter:
(p.264) 9 The Distributive Impact of Intellectual Property Regimes: A Report from the “Natural Experiment” of the Green Revolution1
Source:
Intellectual Property Rights
Author(s):

Timothy Swanson

Timo Goeschl

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199660759.003.0009

Agriculture provides a unique setting for examining a “natural experiment” in the impact of IPR institutions on growth and development. The chapter presents a panel study of yield developments in eight main crops over 1961 to 1999 and shows that for most crops there is absolute convergence to developed-country levels, except in the case of two crops where information was most “impacted”. It then estimates that this impactedness slows diffusion by a factor of 7 per cent of the initial yield gap between the country and the technological frontier. The chapter argues that strong forms of protection for intellectual property right claims would have similar impacts regarding diffusion, and thus that the distribution of benefits from IPR will depend on the initial position of any country regarding the technological frontier. The existence of this innovation-diffusion trade-off highlights the problematic international welfare implications inherent in IPR.

Keywords:   technological diffusion, development, intellectual property rights, distribution, incidence, agricultural yield diffusion

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