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The Birth of the New JusticeThe Internationalization of Crime and Punishment, 1919-1950$
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Mark Lewis

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199660285

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199660285.001.0001

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International Terrorism in the 1920s and ’30s: The Response of European States through the League of Nations and the Attempt to Create an International Criminal Court

International Terrorism in the 1920s and ’30s: The Response of European States through the League of Nations and the Attempt to Create an International Criminal Court

Chapter:
(p.122) 5 International Terrorism in the 1920s and ’30s: The Response of European States through the League of Nations and the Attempt to Create an International Criminal Court
Source:
The Birth of the New Justice
Author(s):

Mark A. Lewis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199660285.003.0006

The Croatian Ustasha's assassination of the King of Yugoslavia and the French Foreign Minister in Marseille in 1934 provided a new catalyst for Vespasien Pella and other criminological jurists to renew their calls to reform the laws of extradition and create a new system to repress cross-border terrorism, which they said could start the next world war. By 1937, the League of Nations hammered out a convention to repress international terrorism and also formulated a statute for an optional international criminal court to prosecute terrorists. A handful of states supported the conventions, seeing them tools to repress radical nationalists and political enemies, but neither instrument ever came into effect. The projects were shelved due to the breakdown of the League and the onset of World War Two. The legal and political motivations behind the conventions show that while support for international legal projects could be voiced in terms of international peace, new legal tools also be used for repressive purposes in the interest of state power

Keywords:   Terrorism, International Criminal Court, League of Nations, Aleksandar I, King of Yugoslavia, 1888–1934—Assassination, Ustasha, Convention for the Repression and Punishment of International Terrorism, Vespasien V. Pella, Henri Carton de Wiart, Leon Trotsky

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