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Shaping EuropeFrance, Germany, and Embedded Bilateralism from the Elysée Treaty to Twenty-First Century Politics$
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Ulrich Krotz and Joachim Schild

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199660087

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199660087.001.0001

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Making, Shaping, and Limiting European Markets

Making, Shaping, and Limiting European Markets

Chapter:
(p.158) 7 Making, Shaping, and Limiting European Markets
Source:
Shaping Europe
Author(s):

Ulrich Krotz

Joachim Schild

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199660087.003.0008

Making and shaping markets was and still is at the heart of European policy making. This chapter reveals how France and Germany made major contributions to the evolution of the common market and specific market-related policies based on different strands of economic ideas and different, but complementary material economic interests. This holds especially true for the setup and evolution of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), where Franco-German accommodation of interests and bilateral compromises had a particularly strong impact. In the 1980s, France and Germany strongly backed the single market program without being among its key promoters. Since the 1990s, both countries have displayed tendencies to adopt more defensive stances with regard to deep market integration and repeatedly limited the speed and scope of market liberalization reforms in order to defend and preserve distinctive national models of policy making. The chapter shows that domestic-level factors largely explain this more cautious approach to European market shaping.

Keywords:   market making, market regulation, market liberalization, Common Market, Single European Market, Common Agricultural Policy (CAP)

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