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The Slain GodAnthropologists and the Christian Faith$
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Timothy Larsen

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199657872

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199657872.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Anthropology, History, and Doubt

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
The Slain God
Author(s):

Timothy Larsen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199657872.003.0001

This introduction sets out the basic themes of the relationship between anthropological evidence and theory and the Christian faith. It situates this study in the context of British social anthropology, and reflects on why the particular figures covered in the main chapters were chosen. It also presents a brief history of British social anthropology: the social evolutionism of the early period, the move to functionalism which was accompanied by the new standard of participant-observer fieldwork, and then the addition of structuralism and its interests in abstractions. Subsequent trends included a humanistic turn, emphases on process, symbolism, meaning, and indigenous exegesis, and turning the anthropological gaze directly on modern, industrial societies. Finally, the assumption that the discipline of anthropology has an anti-faith bias is documented.

Keywords:   British social anthropology, social evolutionism, functionalism, structuralism, anti-faith bias

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