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The Political Integration of Ethnic Minorities in Britain$
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Anthony F. Heath, Stephen D. Fisher, Gemma Rosenblatt, David Sanders, and Maria Sobolewska

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199656639

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199656639.001.0001

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Satisfaction or Disaffection from British Democracy?

Satisfaction or Disaffection from British Democracy?

Chapter:
(p.190) 10 Satisfaction or Disaffection from British Democracy?
Source:
The Political Integration of Ethnic Minorities in Britain
Author(s):

Anthony F. Heath

Stephen D. Fisher

Gemma Rosenblatt

David Sanders

Maria Sobolewska

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199656639.003.0010

This chapter reviews how minorities feel about British democracy and how much they trust British political institutions. As in Chapter 3, the central finding is of convergence across the generations towards the white British profile, the first generation showing markedly greater satisfaction with democracy and trust in parliamentary institutions than does the second generation. Trust in the police is similar for immigrants and the white British but considerably lower for second-generation minorities. Young second-generation people of black Caribbean or mixed heritage are notably more disaffected from British democracy than are other minorities or other British citizens, and this disaffection is linked to feelings of social exclusion and unfairness in the allocation of rewards. Just as the second-generation black groups suffer the largest ethnic penalties in the labour market, so they are the ones who feel most alienated from the political process.

Keywords:   Satisfaction with democracy, political trust, social exclusion, ethnic penalties, political alienation

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