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Electronic Lexicography$
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Sylviane Granger and Magali Paquot

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199654864

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199654864.001.0001

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Wiktionary: A new rival for expert-built lexicons? Exploring the possibilities of collaborative lexicography

Wiktionary: A new rival for expert-built lexicons? Exploring the possibilities of collaborative lexicography

Chapter:
(p.259) 13 Wiktionary: A new rival for expert-built lexicons? Exploring the possibilities of collaborative lexicography
Source:
Electronic Lexicography
Author(s):

Christian M. Meyer

Iryna Gurevych

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199654864.003.0013

With the rise of the Web 2.0, collaboratively constructed language resources are rivaling expert-built lexicons. The collaborative construction process of these resources is driven by what is called the ‘Wisdom of Crowds’ phenomenon, which offers very promising research opportunities in the context of electronic lexicography. The vast number and broad diversity of authors yield quickly growing and constantly updated resources. While expert-built lexicons have been extensively studied in the past, there is still a gap in researching collaboratively constructed lexicons. We therefore provide a comprehensive description of Wiktionary – a freely available, collaborative online lexicon. The chapter studies the variety of encoded lexical, semantic, and cross-lingual knowledge of three different language editions of Wiktionary and compare the coverage of terms, lexemes, word senses, domains, and registers to multiple expert-built lexicons. The chapter concludes by discussing several findings and pointing out Wiktionary’s future directions and impact on lexicography.

Keywords:   Wiktionary, collaboration of Web communities, lexical resources, online dictionaries, collaborative lexicography, comparative study, crowdsourcing

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