Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Form and Faith in Victorian Poetry and Religion$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Kirstie Blair

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199644506

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199644506.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 16 July 2018

‘Familiar Rhythms’: Poetry and the Liturgy

‘Familiar Rhythms’: Poetry and the Liturgy

Chapter:
(p.85) 3 ‘Familiar Rhythms’: Poetry and the Liturgy
Source:
Form and Faith in Victorian Poetry and Religion
Author(s):

Kirstie Blair

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199644506.003.0004

Following on from the previous chapter, Chapter 3 turns to the use of the liturgy within the Church. It considers the revival of interest in the forms of the Book of Common Prayer, again largely spearheaded by the Tractarians and the High Church, and notes the controversy over their use. Turning to poetry on the liturgy, the chapter then offers readings of poems by Wordsworth, Robert Montgomery, and others. The chapter also discusses the plainsong revival and some of its potential for fostering new poetic structures. The second part of the chapter takes a broad view of nostalgic representations of Anglican ritual, studying the impact of the discourse of nostalgia in the poets of ‘doubt’, and closing with a consideration of the poems of Thomas Hardy.

Keywords:   liturgy, Book of Common Prayer, church music, worship, nostalgia, doubt, Hardy

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .