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EU Law after Lisbon$
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Andrea Biondi, Piet Eeckhout, and Stefanie Ripley

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199644322

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199644322.001.0001

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The Lisbon Treaty and the Court of Justice

The Lisbon Treaty and the Court of Justice

Chapter:
(p.197) 9 The Lisbon Treaty and the Court of Justice
Source:
EU Law after Lisbon
Author(s):

Francis G Jacobs

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199644322.003.0009

This chapter discusses the changes affecting the judicial system of the European Union. The chapter deals with changes in the institutional provisions, including a series of significant extensions in the general provisions governing the jurisdiction of the Courts. Further, the Lisbon Treaty introduces important changes on fundamental rights which are examined in light of their impact on the Court of Justice. Finally, the chapter discusses changes affecting appointments to the Courts. The main overall conclusion is that the various extensions of the jurisdiction of the Courts under the Lisbon Treaty are to be welcomed in a Union based on the rule of law. They represent, taken in their entirety, a major advance for the European Union. But it cannot be denied that they also present challenges of a novel kind for the Courts; and they may even require, sooner rather than later, some re-shaping of the Union's judicial system.

Keywords:   European Court of Justice, developments to the judicial system, Treaty, fundamental rights

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