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The Psychology of Music in Multimedia$
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Siu-Lan Tan, Annabel J. Cohen, Scott D. Lipscomb, and Roger A. Kendall

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199608157

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199608157.001.0001

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Children’s media: The role of music and audio features

Children’s media: The role of music and audio features

Chapter:
(p.267) Chapter 12 Children’s media: The role of music and audio features
Source:
The Psychology of Music in Multimedia
Author(s):

Sandra L. Calvert

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199608157.003.0012

This chapter explores the effects of music, singing, sound effects, and vocalizations on children’s attention and learning in multimedia experiences in both entertainment and educational contexts. Empirical findings in the related research are traced, beginning with studies focusing on infants and young children and then moving to older children and adolescents. The role of music on the moods and feelings of youth, including the link to learning, is examined. The ways that older youth are now creating their own digital stories via a new generation of multimedia authoring tools, employing the same production techniques that they often enjoy as consumers of multimedia, are also considered. Overall, the current research indicates that music, singing, and other auditory features in their multimedia use play a key role in children and adolescents’ emotional regulation, cognitive development, and identity construction. In the concluding remarks, promising research directions for the field are also advanced.

Keywords:   music, singing, sound effects, television, video, multimedia, memory, perceptual salience, infants, children, adolescents

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