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Applied MusicologyUsing Zygonic Theory to Inform Music Education, Therapy and Psychology Research$
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Adam Ockelford

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199607631

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199607631.001.0001

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From intentionality to influence: gauging the impact of one performer on another in improvised musical dialogs

From intentionality to influence: gauging the impact of one performer on another in improvised musical dialogs

Chapter:
(p.86) Chapter 4 From intentionality to influence: gauging the impact of one performer on another in improvised musical dialogs
Source:
Applied Musicology
Author(s):

Adam Ockelford

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199607631.003.0004

This chapter moves from considering intentionality in improvised musical interactions (assessed by gauging the extent to which one participant can be considered to imitate another) to evaluating relationships of influence between the two performers, whereby the music created by one is considered to have an impact on that generated by the other. Such relationships are fundamental in music education and therapy—and, indeed, in ensemble playing in general. Until recently, however, most analysis has been indirect, with data obtained by interviewing participants (teachers, pupils, therapists, clients and musicians) and asking them to reflect on what occurred. However, zygonic theory enables us to gauge influence in improvised musical dialogues directly (through analysis of the music itself) with some rigour and precision. This chapter sets out a theory of musical influence from a zygonic perspective, and leads us through a number of worked examples of this proposition in action.

Keywords:   zygonic theory, intentionality, influence, improvisation, music education, music therapy

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