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The Legal Protection of Human Rights
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The Legal Protection of Human Rights: Sceptical Essays

Tom Campbell, K.D. Ewing, and Adam Tomkins

Abstract

Reacting to the poor record of the UK Human Rights Act 1998 and similar provisions in protecting human rights, this book explores ways of promoting human rights more effectively through political and democratic mechanisms. The book expresses ideological scepticism concerning the relative neglect of social and economic rights and institutional scepticism concerning the failures of court-centred means for enhancing human rights goals in general. Criticizing the ‘juridification’ of human rights through the transferring of the prime responsibility for defining human rights violations to courts and ... More

Keywords: human rights, scepticism, human rights law, judicial review, democracy, constitutional law, UK Human Rights Act

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2011 Print ISBN-13: 9780199606078
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199606078.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Tom Campbell, editor
Professorial Fellow and Director of the Charles Sturt University Division of the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics

K.D. Ewing, editor
Professor of Public Law at King's College London

Adam Tomkins, editor
John Millar Professor of Public Law at the School of Law, University of Glasgow
Author Webpage

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Contents

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PART I FAILURES OF JURIDIFICATION

PART II POLITICIZING HUMAN RIGHTS

End Matter