Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Poetry of TranslationFrom Chaucer & Petrarch to Homer & Logue$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Matthew Reynolds

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199605712

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199605712.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 13 December 2018

Some Perspectives after Pope: Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Pound, Michael Longley

Some Perspectives after Pope: Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Pound, Michael Longley

Chapter:
(p.207) 21 Some Perspectives after Pope: Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Pound, Michael Longley
Source:
The Poetry of Translation
Author(s):

Matthew Reynolds

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199605712.003.0021

The idea that a translator might respond to an epic landscape by ‘taking a view’ was banished from translation during the turn to literalness that lasted (broadly speaking) throughout the nineteenth century. But it persisted in more freely responsive poems by Tennyson and Browning, and came back into translation with the version of part of the Odyssey at the start of Pound's Cantos. More recently it has flourished in the ‘freeze‐frames’ from Homer made by the Belfast poet Michael Longley, which I discuss at some length.

Keywords:   view, landscape, adherence, literal, Browning, Tennyson, Pound, Michael Longley, Homer

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .