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‘Lords of Wine and Oile’Community and Conviviality in the Poetry of Robert Herrick$
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Ruth Connolly and Tom Cain

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199604777

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199604777.001.0001

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‘Thou & Ile sing to make these dull Shades merry’: Herrick’s Charon Dialogues

‘Thou & Ile sing to make these dull Shades merry’: Herrick’s Charon Dialogues

Chapter:
(p.153) 7 ‘Thou & Ile sing to make these dull Shades merry’: Herrick’s Charon Dialogues
Source:
‘Lords of Wine and Oile’
Author(s):

Richard Wistreich

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199604777.003.0008

Literary analysis of Robert Herrick's two Charon dialogues, published in John Playford's Select Musicall Ayres and Dialogues (1652), contextualizes them in the wider European Charon dialogue tradition that draws on a rich set of classical references, including Virgil and Lucian. Appreciation of the parodic ‘Charon and Eucosmia’, an elegy for the prominent royalist, Henry, Lord Hastings, with music by Henry Lawes, depends on familiarity with this otherwise comic genre, epitomized by its partner piece, ‘Charon and Philomel’ (music by William Lawes). Playford's volume anthologizes songs of the pre-Civil-War court, memorializing its particular social ambience and shared frames of literary reference, and may have played a role in post-regicide sustenance of royalist solidarity through social performances, or ‘musickings’.

Keywords:   Charon, Lawes, John Playford, Royalist, musicking, Select Musicall Ayres and Dialogues

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