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Settlement, Urbanization, and Population$
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Alan Bowman and Andrew Wilson

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199602353

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199602353.001.0001

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The Urban System of Roman Asia Minor and Wider Urban Connectivity

The Urban System of Roman Asia Minor and Wider Urban Connectivity

Chapter:
(p.229) 9 The Urban System of Roman Asia Minor and Wider Urban Connectivity
Source:
Settlement, Urbanization, and Population
Author(s):

J. W. Hanson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199602353.003.0009

This chapter examines the urban system of Roman Asia. The distribution of urban sites indicates that a large proportion of Roman Asia was surveyed and controlled by urban centres, fairly evenly distributed across relief, but not across space, becoming sparser in the central plateau and east. The dense clustering of cities seems to reduce the span of control of individual cities within the region considerably, resulting in an average intercity distance of 24.5 km. Supporting this is a far denser network of agricultural sites. This arrangement seems to tally reasonably precisely with central place theory, since sites seem to have functioned as nodes of control (military and political) and as centres of administration and justice, as well as service centres.

Keywords:   Roman Asia, urbanization, urban sites, central place theory

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