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Neuroscience in EducationThe good, the bad, and the ugly$
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Sergio Della Sala and Mike Anderson

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199600496

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199600496.001.0001

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Of all the conferences in all the towns in all the world, what in heaven’s name brought us to neuroeducation?

Of all the conferences in all the towns in all the world, what in heaven’s name brought us to neuroeducation?

Chapter:
(p.356) Chapter 22 Of all the conferences in all the towns in all the world, what in heaven’s name brought us to neuroeducation?
Source:
Neuroscience in Education
Author(s):

Mike Anderson

Mary Oliver

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199600496.003.0111

This chapter provides a whistle-stop tour of the major issues and concerns in this meeting of neuroscience and education. The main goal is to draw out what it is about neuroscience that is so beguiling for educators. It may be something as simple as this little syllogism: education is about children's learning; the brain is responsible for learning; and neuroscience (the scientific study of the brain) is fundamental to education. Yet the way learning is instantiated in brain processes, and even more pertinently how the brain develops, and how either relates to the way children are best educated, is more akin to speculation than scientific hypothesis — never mind fact. Be that as it may, it is clear to us that neuroscience will only grow in influence.

Keywords:   neuroscience, education, learning, brain processes

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