Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Law and NeuroscienceCurrent Legal Issues Volume 13$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michael Freeman

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199599844

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199599844.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 October 2017

Neuroscience and Penal Law: Ineffectiveness of the Penal Systems and Flawed Perception of the Under‐Evaluation of Behaviour Constituting Crime. The Particular Case of Crimes Regarding Intangible Goods

Neuroscience and Penal Law: Ineffectiveness of the Penal Systems and Flawed Perception of the Under‐Evaluation of Behaviour Constituting Crime. The Particular Case of Crimes Regarding Intangible Goods

Chapter:
(p.193) 11 Neuroscience and Penal Law: Ineffectiveness of the Penal Systems and Flawed Perception of the Under‐Evaluation of Behaviour Constituting Crime. The Particular Case of Crimes Regarding Intangible Goods
Source:
Law and Neuroscience
Author(s):

David Terracina

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199599844.003.0011

Contemporary penal systems have long suffered a profound crisis of ineffectiveness. Judicial statistics show a crime rate that is constantly on the rise, whether these are blood crimes or crimes of a patrimonial nature. Obviously, the chronic ineffectiveness of the penal systems cannot depend on merely one factor. In addition, it is unlikely on the one hand that all factors determining a crisis of such proportions can be known; while, on the other hand, it is highly likely that the mechanisms of the factors known are not completely understood. Hence, dealing with a combination of heterogeneous factors, both exogenous and endogenous, there can be no single solution that is able to restore the likes of the penal systems by itself. This chapter argues that cognitive neuroscience could provide useful instruments to comprehend some of the factors responsible for the ineffectiveness of the penal systems.

Keywords:   cognitive neuroscience, penal systems, crime, judicial statistics, crime rate

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .