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Thought in ActionExpertise and the Conscious Mind$
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Barbara Gail Montero

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199596775

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199596775.001.0001

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Sex, Drugs, Rock and Roll, and the Meaning of Life

Sex, Drugs, Rock and Roll, and the Meaning of Life

Chapter:
(p.237) 12 Sex, Drugs, Rock and Roll, and the Meaning of Life
Source:
Thought in Action
Author(s):

Barbara Gail Montero

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199596775.003.0013

Why do so many accept the idea that expert action occurs automatically and effortlessly if, as has been argued, it lacks support? After summarizing the book’s main thesis, this chapter attempts to answer this question by, among other things, analyzing the supposed “aha” moment, including that of Archimedes’ purported Eureka discovery. It also address Hubert Dreyfus and Sean Kelly’s view that the key to living a meaningful life is tied up with being “taken over by the situation.” The argument presented here draws from what Immanuel Kant spoke of as our duty to cultivate our “predispositions to greater perfection,” and is grounded in the idea that a meaningful life must include developing one’s potential. This chapter also addresses the questions of whether drugs can facilitate effortless creativity, whether rock musicians just do it, and whether thinking interferes with optimal sexual performance.

Keywords:   inspiration, Kant, Dreyfus, Sean Kelly, Archimedes, aha, creativity, drugs, rock music, sex

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