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Modernism and the MuseumAsian, African, and Pacific Art and the London Avant-Garde$
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Rupert Richard Arrowsmith

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199593699

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199593699.001.0001

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‘Kuanon of all Delights’

‘Kuanon of all Delights’

Seven Lakes, Eight Views, and the Korean Goddess of The Cantos

Chapter:
(p.200) 9 ‘Kuanon of all Delights’
Source:
Modernism and the Museum
Author(s):

Rupert Richard Arrowsmith

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199593699.003.0010

This chapter begins by considering the renewal of contact between Pound and Laurence Binyon just prior to the outbreak of the Second World War, showing that this was the main stimulus behind the writing of the Seven Lakes Canto. It next considers the widespread use of East Asian imagery in The Pisan Cantos, suggesting that Pound's obsessive recollection in them of his time in London —which he refers to as ‘a British Museum era’ —prompted the renewed use of motifs and commentaries on East Asian art viewed years before with Binyon in the Print Room. Finally, new evidence is presented showing that the primary origin of the mysterious hybrid goddess Kuanon, who appears throughout the later Cantos, was based on a seventh-century bodhisattva sculpture from Korea.

Keywords:   Ezra Pound, Pisan Cantos, Japanese art, Chinese art, Korean art, Laurence Binyon, Kuanon, British Museum, Seven Lakes, Hiroshige

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