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Thucydides and Herodotus$
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Edith Foster and Donald Lateiner

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199593262

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199593262.001.0001

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A Noble Alliance: Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon’s Procles ⋆

A Noble Alliance: Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon’s Procles ⋆

Chapter:
(p.316) 12 A Noble Alliance: Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon’s Procles
Source:
Thucydides and Herodotus
Author(s):

Emily Baragwanath

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199593262.003.0012

Xenophon, when he turned to writing history, harked back to his predecessors — and above all to the pair who form the subject of this collection — in ways that signal his adherence to the historiographical tradition, even as he underscored the distinctiveness of his own approach and philosophy of history. This chapter begins with a brief overview of what Xenophon's self-declared emphases in Hellenica reveal of how he conceives of his role in the historiographical tradition. It then contends that his conception of this role informs key moments in the work, through an examination of how the speeches of Procles of Phlius (in an episode whose significance Xenophon's narrative underscores) contribute to Xenophon's construction of his historiographical persona.

Keywords:   Xenophon, Greek history, Hellenica, Procles of Philius

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