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Components of Emotional MeaningA sourcebook$

Johnny J. R. Fontaine, Klaus R. Scherer, and Cristina Soriano

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199592746

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199592746.001.0001

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(p.570) Appendix 3 CoreGRID instrument

(p.570) Appendix 3 CoreGRID instrument

Source:
Components of Emotional Meaning
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Around the world, people use words to describe their ongoing or past emotional experiences. By using a single emotion word, people can convey a lot of information. They can refer to their interpretation of the situation that caused the emotional experience, the bodily symptoms they felt, the way they expressed their emotional experience, the way they wanted to react to the situation, their actual feelings, or the way they tried to regulate their emotion.

In the present study, we would like to examine how languages differ with respect to the information that can be inferred when persons use emotion words to describe their emotional experience. In other words, we are interested in understanding the explicit and implicit meanings of emotion words across languages.

We would like to ask you to define the meaning of different emotion words, as commonly used in your language, in terms of a set of emotion features. These features are grouped in the following categories:

  1. 1 Feelings—features describing the feeling that characterizes the emotion

  2. 2 Bodily reactions—features describing the bodily reactions that tend to occur during the emotional state

  3. 3 Expression—features describing facial and vocal expressions that accompany the emotion

  4. 4 Behavioral tendencies—features describing tendencies to behave in certain ways that accompany the emotion.

  5. 5 Event evaluation—features describing the person’s evaluation or appraisal of the event, conscious or not.

We would like you to focus as much as possible on the meaning of each of the emotion words among speakers of your language.

Please rate the likelihood of each emotion feature occurring when a particular emotion word is used by speakers of your language to describe an emotional experience.

For each feature, you can use the following nine-point response scale to indicate the likelihood of the feature occurring when a speaker of your native language uses a particular emotion word to describe his/her emotional experience.

Extremely unlikely

Neither likely, nor unlikely

Extremely likely

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Thank you in advance for your time and cooperation.

To be able to compare the results across cultures and languages, we need some background information. Thank you for answering the following questions.

  • Sex: male/female

  • How old are you?

  • (p.571) Where did you spend most of your life (country)?

  • Where do you live now (country)?

  • Educational attainment:

    • basic education

    • basic education + vocational training

    • secondary education

    • university/college education

  • Are you a student currently enrolled at a university? yes/no

  • Did you, your parents or your grandparents, migrate to the country where you are residing now?

  • If yes, what was the country of origin?

Feelings

This section lists features describing the feeling referred to by the emotion words.

If a speaker of your native language as spoken in your country or region uses the following emotion words1 to describe an emotional experience, how likely is it that the person felt:

  1. 1 the emotion very intensely

  2. 2 the emotion for a long time

  3. 3 good

  4. 4 tired

  5. 5 restless

  6. 6 strong

  7. 7 calm

  8. 8 bad

  9. 9 awake

  10. 10 weak

Bodily reactions

This section lists features describing the bodily reactions that can occur during an emotional experience.

If a speaker of your native language as spoken in your country or region uses the following emotion words to describe an emotional experience, how likely is it that the person had the following bodily reactions?

  1. 11 feeling weak limbs

  2. 12 becoming pale

  3. 13 stomach disturbance

  4. 14 slowed heart rate

  5. (p.572) 15 rapid heart rate

  6. 16 muscles tensing

  7. 17 slowed breathing

  8. 18 rapid breathing

  9. 19 feeling warm

  10. 20 sweating

  11. 21 feeling cold

Expression

This section lists features describing the facial and vocal expressions that occur during emotional experiences.

If a speaker of your native language as spoken in your country or region uses the following emotion words to describe an emotional experience, how likely is it that the person:

  1. 22 smiled

  2. 23 had the jaw drop

  3. 24 raised the eyebrows

  4. 25 frowned

  5. 26 closed the eyes

  6. 27 had tears in the eyes

  7. 28 spoke more loudly

  8. 29 spoke in a trembling voice

  9. 30 spoke in a firm voice

  10. 31 had speech disturbances

  11. 32 spoke more rapidly

  12. 33 spoke more slowly

Behavioral tendencies

This section lists features describing tendencies to behave in certain ways that may occur during an emotional experience.

If a speaker of your native language as spoken in your country or region uses the following emotion words to describe an emotional experience, how likely is it that the person:

  1. 34 wanted the ongoing situation to last or be repeated

  2. 35 wanted to stop what he/she was doing

  3. 36 wanted to undo what was happening

  4. 37 wanted to comply with someone else’s wishes

  5. 38 wanted to leave the initiative to someone else

  6. 39 wanted to overcome an obstacle

  7. 40 wanted to do nothing

  8. 41 lacked the motivation to pay attention to what was going on

  9. (p.573) 42 wanted to disappear or hide from others

  10. 43 wanted to do damage, hit, or say something that hurts

  11. 44 wanted to oppose someone or something

  12. 45 wanted to tackle the situation

  13. 46 wanted to run away in any direction

  14. 47 wanted to sing and dance

Event evaluation

This section lists features describing the evaluation or appraisal (conscious or not) of the situation that led to the emotion.

If a speaker of your native language as spoken in your country or region uses the following emotion words to describe an emotional experience caused by an event, how likely is it that

  1. 48 the event had consequences that were predictable

  2. 49 the event had negative, undesirable consequences for the person

  3. 50 the event happened by chance

  4. 51 the event involved the violation of laws or socially accepted norms

  5. 52 the event occurred suddenly

  6. 53 the event required an immediate response

  7. 54 the event was caused by somebody else’s behavior

  8. 55 the event was important for and relevant to the person’s goals or needs

  9. 56 the event was uncontrollable

  10. 57 the event was pleasant for the person

  11. 58 the event was unpredictable

  12. 59 there was no urgency in the situation

  13. 60 the person could control the consequences of the event

  14. 61 the event was caused by the person’s own behavior

  15. 62 the event was important for and relevant to the goals or needs of somebody else

  16. 63 the person had a dominant position in the situation

  17. 64 the event was inconsistent with the person’s own standards and ideals

  18. 65 the person had power over the consequences of the event

  19. 66 the event confirmed the expectations of the person

  20. 67 the person was powerless in the situation

  21. 68 the person could live with the consequences of the event

Personal information

To be able to compare the results across cultures and languages, we need some background information. Thank you for answering the following questions.

Next you will find the description of two different individuals. Which person do you think resembles you most? Please choose the profile that best characterizes you, even if one or two items do not apply.

  • (p.574) Person A: Likes languages a lot, reads a lot, expresses herself or himself clearly, likes games like cross-words, does not like numbers

  • Person B: Is good at Maths, is at ease with abstract symbols, likes strategy games like chess, does not pay much attention to her or his writing style

What is your mother tongue (language you were raised in)?

Which languages do you know (all languages of which you have at least a passive knowledge)?

During the last year, I spoke/read/wrote in this language:

  1. 1 on a daily basis

  2. 2 at least once a week

  3. 3 at least once a month

  4. 4 several times a year

  5. 5 (almost) never

To be rated for all languages with at least a passive knowledge.

Do you have any comments on the questions or their presentation? Please write them down here.

You are now done with the questionnaire.

We thank you for your participation in this study.

Notes:

(1) In the online study several emotion terms are displayed on screen for the participant to rate.