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Force or FraudBritish Seduction Stories and the Problem of Resistance, 1660-1760$
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Toni Bowers

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199592135

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199592135.001.0001

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Seduction Stories in Seventeenth‐Century Literary History

Seduction Stories in Seventeenth‐Century Literary History

Chapter:
(p.29) 1 Seduction Stories in Seventeenth‐Century Literary History
Source:
Force or Fraud
Author(s):

Toni Bowers (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199592135.003.0002

This chapter considers the genealogy of seduction stories prior to the late seventeenth century, demonstrating that female sexual agency emerges early as a peculiarly complex and generative problem. The late seventeenth-century emergence of the terms “whig,” “tory,” and “jacobite”—as both partisan labels and descriptors of ideological sensibilities—is considered, along with various connotations and points of inadequacy within those terms. The chapter concludes by arguing that seduction topoi resonated with special power for “new tory” subjects struggling to reconcile ideological principles with irresistible practices of complicity and collusion.

Keywords:   seduction story, Héloïse and Abelard, Marie‐Madeleine de Lafayette, La Princesse de Clèves (1678), seduction topoi, whig, tory, jacobite, sexual agency

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