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MolinismThe Contemporary Debate$
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Ken Perszyk

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199590629

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199590629.001.0001

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Whence and Whither the Molinist Debate: A Reply to Hasker

Whence and Whither the Molinist Debate: A Reply to Hasker

Chapter:
(p.37) 2 Whence and Whither the Molinist Debate: A Reply to Hasker
Source:
Molinism
Author(s):

Thomas P. Flint

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199590629.003.0003

This chapter provides a Molinist response to William Hasker's ‘The (Non‐) Existence of Molinist Counterfactuals’. Flint differs to some extent with Hasker's presentation of the major anti‐Molinist arguments of the last thirty years, and strives to show just where Hasker's most recent ‘bringing about’ argument fails. He also questions Hasker's suggestion that progress is most likely to be made if we focus our attention primarily on continuing to investigate these arguments. Instead, Flint proposes that more energy should be devoted toward examining the longer history of the dispute over Molinism, toward philosophically developing in greater detail each of the three major views of divine providence, and especially toward applying each of the three general perspectives to particular areas of Christian belief or practice.

Keywords:   Molinism, Hasker, middle knowledge, grounding, bringing about

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