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MolinismThe Contemporary Debate$
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Ken Perszyk

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199590629

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199590629.001.0001

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Molinism and the Thin Red Line

Molinism and the Thin Red Line

Chapter:
(p.227) 14 Molinism and the Thin Red Line
Source:
Molinism
Author(s):

Greg Restall

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199590629.003.0015

Molinism is an attempt to do equal justice to divine foreknowledge and human freedom. For Molinists, human freedom fits in this universe, for the future is open or unsettled. However, God's middle knowledge—God's contingent knowledge of what agents would freely do in this or that circumstance—underwrites God's omniscience in the midst of this openness. This essay rehearses Nuel Belnap and Mitchell Green's argument in ‘Indeterminism and the Thin Red Line’ against the reality of a distinguished single future in the context of branching time, and shows that it applies equally against the view combining Molinism and branching time. In the process, we will see how contemporary work in the logic of temporal notions in the context of branching time (specifically, Prior–Thomason semantics) can illuminate discussions in the metaphysics of freedom and divine knowledge.

Keywords:   Molinism, middle knowledge, branching time, future, indeterminism, temporal logic, semantics

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