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Morphological AutonomyPerspectives From Romance Inflectional Morphology$
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Martin Maiden, John Charles Smith, Maria Goldbach, and Marc-Olivier Hinzelin

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199589982

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199589982.001.0001

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Stress‐conditioned Allomorphy in Surmiran (Rumantsch)

Stress‐conditioned Allomorphy in Surmiran (Rumantsch)

Chapter:
(p.12) (p.13) 1 Stress‐conditioned Allomorphy in Surmiran (Rumantsch)
Source:
Morphological Autonomy
Author(s):

Stephen R. Anderson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199589982.003.0002

An extensive system of stress‐conditioned vowel alternations has developed in the history of this form of Rumantsch from purely phonological status to that of phonologically conditioned allomorphy. Synchronically, Surmiran stems must in general have two listed forms, one used when primary stress falls on the last vowel of the stem and the other when this vowel will not bear primary stress. This pattern is most thoroughly exemplified in the verbal system. In my chapter I will discuss its effect elsewhere in the morphology of Surmiran as well.

Keywords:   stress, stem, phonological, cyclic phonology, allomorphy

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