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TimeLanguage, Cognition, and Reality$
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Kasia M. Jaszczolt and Louis de Saussure

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199589876

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199589876.001.0001

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Modal auxiliaries and tense: the case of Dutch

Modal auxiliaries and tense: the case of Dutch

Chapter:
(p.72) (p.73) 4 Modal auxiliaries and tense: the case of Dutch
Source:
Time
Author(s):

Pieter Byloo

Jan Nuyts

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199589876.003.0005

This paper explores one dimension of the interaction between time and (different types of) modality, viz. what happens semantically when expressions of these categories meet in a clause. Specifically, the paper focuses on the semantic effects of the interaction between tense and the modal auxiliaries in a clause – i.e. the grammatical devices for expressing these semantic categories. And it uses Dutch as a case, a language in which – unlike in English – the ‘flectional’ possibilities of the modals (with fully productive preterite and infinite forms) and the flexibility in the organization of the verbal group allow an interesting range of combinations of these forms. The analysis is conceived against the background of a cognitive-functional perspective on language.

Keywords:   time, modality, tense, modal auxiliaries, cognitive linguistics, functional linguistics

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