Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
TimeLanguage, Cognition, and Reality$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Kasia M. Jaszczolt and Louis de Saussure

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199589876

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199589876.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 15 December 2018

Frames of reference and the linguistic conceptualization of time: Present and future

Frames of reference and the linguistic conceptualization of time: Present and future

Chapter:
(p.236) 11 Frames of reference and the linguistic conceptualization of time: Present and future
Source:
Time
Author(s):

Paul Chilton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199589876.003.0012

How is morphologically marked tense related to conceptual time? At the core of this paper is the problem of relating present tense forms, primarily in English, to times other than those of the speaker’s present. The explanation proposed here rests on the notion of reference frame, which is theoretically embedded in Deictic Space Theory (DST), a theory that proposes a geometrical model involving the three conceptual dimensions of time, modality and attentional focus. The paper shows how the DST framework models the use of present tense to refer to future times and the use of the future tense to communicate a modal meaning. The overall structure of the theory uses geometrical notions in order to represent spatial concepts that ground more abstract concepts, in particular those of temporal and modal ‘distance’.

Keywords:   time, tense, modality, reference frames, deictic space, distance, geometry

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .