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Visual Aspects of Dyslexia$
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John Stein and Zoï Kapoula

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199589814

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199589814.001.0001

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Visual Discomfort and Reading

Visual Discomfort and Reading

Chapter:
(p.79) Chapter 5 Visual Discomfort and Reading
Source:
Visual Aspects of Dyslexia
Author(s):

Elizabeth G. Conlon

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199589814.003.0005

Visual discomfort, also referred to as visual stress or Meares-Irlen syndrome, is a collection of somatic and perceptual effects induced in sensitive individuals on exposure to bright light or repetitive striped patterns such as those found on a page of text. Individuals with visual discomfort, otherwise normally functioning, perform visual search and processing speed tasks inefficiently. When orally reading text, this group performs slowly and laboriously, but when silently reading for good comprehension, individuals with visual discomfort trade accuracy for speed and have poor reading comprehension. One explanation for these effects is that individuals with visual discomfort have difficulties extracting relevant signals from irrelevant noise when confronted with a number of different stimulus configurations such as those presented on a page of text. At a cognitive level, this may occur because of difficulties with sustained visual attention. Although cortical hyperexcitability provides a framework to investigate the anomalous effects found, it is argued that future research should contrast the specific neural underpinnings of visual discomfort in individuals who also have migraine or dyslexia to obtain further evidence about the patterns of neural impairment found in different groups.

Keywords:   visual discomfort, visual stress, Meares-Irlen syndrome, reading, visual search

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