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The Complementizer PhaseSubjects and Operators$
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E. Phoevos Panagiotidis

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199584352

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199584352.001.0001

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Complex Wh‐phrases Don't Move: On the Interaction between the Split CP Hypothesis and the Syntax of Wh‐movement

Complex Wh‐phrases Don't Move: On the Interaction between the Split CP Hypothesis and the Syntax of Wh‐movement

Chapter:
(p.236) 10 Complex Wh‐phrases Don't Move: On the Interaction between the Split CP Hypothesis and the Syntax of Wh‐movement
Source:
The Complementizer Phase
Author(s):

Jeroen van Craenenbroeck

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199584352.003.0010

This chapter starts out from a set of well‐known syntactic differences and similarities between simple wh‐phrases such as who or what and complex ones such as which boy. It translates these observations into a cartographic account of the left periphery and then proceeds to show how this new proposal is able to account for a wide range of at first sight disparate data from English, German, Frisian and (dialectal) Dutch. The final part of the chapter briefly discusses the implications of the proposal for the theory of reconstruction.

Keywords:   simple and complex wh‐phrases, wh‐movement, split CP‐hypothesis, operators, clause typing

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