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Frontiers of Violence
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Frontiers of Violence: Conflict and Identity in Ulster and Upper Silesia 1918-1922

Timothy Wilson

Abstract

Both Ulster and Upper Silesia saw conflicts over self-determination in the years after the First World War. The violence in Upper Silesia was more intense both in the numbers killed and in the forms it took. Acts of violation such as rape or mutilation were noticeably more common in Upper Silesia than in Ulster. This book argues that an examination of communal boundaries offers the most fruitful avenue for explaining the profound contrasts in these experiences of plebeian violence. In Ulster the rival communities were divided by religion, but they shared a common language. In Upper Silesia, th ... More

Keywords: Ulster, Northern Ireland, Upper Silesia, German-Polish conflict, borderlands, ethnic conflict, political violence, nationalism, ethnoreligious, ethno-linguistic

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2010 Print ISBN-13: 9780199583713
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199583713.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Timothy Wilson, author
Departmental Lecturer in Modern Irish History, University of Oxford

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