Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Historians and NationalismEast-Central Europe in the Nineteenth Century$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Monika Baár

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199581184

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199581184.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 15 August 2018

National Antiquities

National Antiquities

Chapter:
(p.167) 6 National Antiquities
Source:
Historians and Nationalism
Author(s):

Monika Baár (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199581184.003.0007

Chapter 6, ‘National Antiquities’, looks at the problems of origins and the representation of early societies in the historians' work. It points to the crucial role that myths of origins have occupied in European historiography. It discusses various versions of ‘antiquity’: Nordic, Indo‐European, Latin, ‘Semi‐Nomadic’ and a putative Slavic variant. It demonstrates that early societies were portrayed by an appeal to Tacitean topoi and were strikingly similar to representations in mainstream historiography. Social justice, equality, common ownership of lands, and chiefs who selflessly represented their community characterized this idyllic ahistorical situation. The view is put forward that images of antiquity were relational and competitive, as claims about seniority were typically made in relation to equivalent assertions about other nations.

Keywords:   national antiquities, myths of origin, Tacitean liberties, Nordic antiquity, Slavonic antiquity, Latin antiquity, Indo‐European antiquity, Semi‐Nomadic antiquity, ancient democracy, pagan culture

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .