Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Neutron Protein CrystallographyHydrogen, Protons, and Hydration in Bio-macromolecules$

Nobuo Niimura and Alberto Podjarny

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199578863

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199578863.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy). Subscriber: null; date: 21 January 2017

(p.211) Appendix C Typical examples of nuclear density maps of amino acid residues

(p.211) Appendix C Typical examples of nuclear density maps of amino acid residues

Source:
Neutron Protein Crystallography
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Typical examples of nuclear density maps of amino acid residues are given to check rapidly how hydrogen atoms can be seen by NPC, although some of them have been already shown in the text.

Appendix C Typical examples of nuclear density maps of amino acid residues

Figure C.1: Alanine and isoleucine of rubredoxin-wild type (1.5Å resolution). Hydrogen omit map. (See Figure III-3.3.)

(p.212)
Appendix C Typical examples of nuclear density maps of amino acid residues

Figure C.2: Valine of RNase A (1.7Å resolution). 2Fo-Fc map.

(p.213)
Appendix C Typical examples of nuclear density maps of amino acid residues

Figure C.3: Proline of RNase A (1.7Å resolution). 2Fo-Fc map.

Appendix C Typical examples of nuclear density maps of amino acid residues

Figure C.4: (a)Phenylalanine, (b)tyrosine, and (c)tryptophan of rubredoxin-wild type (1.5Å resolution). 2Fo-Fc map. (See Figure III-2.1.)

(p.214)
Appendix C Typical examples of nuclear density maps of amino acid residues

Figure C.5: Methionine of myoglobin (1.5Å resolution). 2Fo-Fc map. Note: it is very difficult to see sulfur in NPC, because the scattering length of a sulfur atom is the smallest among constituent elements of amino acid residues. (See Table I-2.2.)

Appendix C Typical examples of nuclear density maps of amino acid residues

Figure C.6: Serine & threonine of RNase A (1.7Å resolution). 2Fo-Fc map.

(p.215)
Appendix C Typical examples of nuclear density maps of amino acid residues

Figure C.7: Lysine of rubredoxin-wild type (1.5 Å resolution). 2Fo-Fc map. Note: it is very difficult see -CH2- in medium-resolutionNPC, because the positive and negative scattering length of carbon and hydrogen atoms appear to sum almost to zero in the 2Fo-Fc map.

(p.216)
Appendix C Typical examples of nuclear density maps of amino acid residues

Figure C.8: Lysine of fully deuterated aldose reductase (2.2 Å resolution). 2Fo-Fc map. Note: -CD2- is very easily seen even in medium-resolution NPC. (See Figure III-2.3.)

(p.217)
Appendix C Typical examples of nuclear density maps of amino acid residues

Figure C.9: Arginine of myoglobin (1.5 Å resolution). 2Fo-Fc map. Note: in NPC the C(NH2)3 group of arginine can be clearly seen as a clover-leaf shape because the scattering length of a nitrogen atom is the largest among constituent elements of amino acid residues and hydrogen atoms are replaced by deuterium, the scattering length of which is also rather large. (See Table I-2.2.)

(p.218)
Appendix C Typical examples of nuclear density maps of amino acid residues

Figure C.10: Histidine of myoglobin (1.5 Å resolution). 2Fo-Fc map. (See Figure III-5.5.)

(p.219)
Appendix C Typical examples of nuclear density maps of amino acid residues

Figure C.11: Asparagine of rubredoxin-mutant (1.6 Å resolution). Note: in the case of (COND2) the contours themselves easily distinguish the ND2 group from the O atom. (See Figure III-2.4.)