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Chariton of Aphrodisias and the Invention of the Greek Love Novel$
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Stefan Tilg

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199576944

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199576944.001.0001

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Novelty

Novelty

Chapter:
(p.164) 5 Novelty
Source:
Chariton of Aphrodisias and the Invention of the Greek Love Novel
Author(s):

Stefan Tilg

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199576944.003.0005

Chapter five tracks Chariton's awareness of literary novelty. First, it presents and interprets all passages in which Chariton explicitly claims to do something original. Then, it analyses all occurrences of the adjective καινόσ – which means ‘new’, but also ‘original’, ‘novel’ – and related terms in Chariton and other novelists. My result is that Chariton invokes the idea of ‘novelty’ (καινότησ) particularly when he refers to something related to his inventing Narratives about Callirhoe: new motifs, new twists in the plot, new narratives. A comparison with the other authors of ideal novels demonstrates that they neither explicitly claim originality for their writing nor use the adjective καινόσ or similar terms of novelty as a fundamental and wide‐ranging category of invention.

Keywords:   literary Novelty, claims of originality (plot, narratives, motifs), term καινόσ

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