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The Civil Procedure Rules Ten Years On$
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Déirdre Dwyer

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199576883

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199576883.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Introduction
Source:
The Civil Procedure Rules Ten Years On
Author(s):

Déirdre Dwyer

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199576883.003.0001

The Civil Procedure Rules (CPR), which unified the rules of civil procedure in the High Court and county courts for the first time, took effect in April 1999. Based on the findings of Lord Woolf's Access to Justice inquiry, the CPR represented the single greatest change to the rules of civil procedure in England and Wales since the introduction of the Rules of the Supreme Court in 1883. This chapter discusses the broader historical, procedural, and policy contexts within which we might understand the CPR as being ‘a new procedural code’. It also discusses case management, costs and funding, civil evidence, and alternative dispute resolution. It also considers both the influence of the CPR on procedural reform in Europe, and the effects of EC.

Keywords:   Civil Rules Procedure, CPR, Lord Woolf, Access to Justice, England, Wales, case management, costs, funding, civil evidence

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