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Christ as CreatorOrigins of a New Testament Doctrine$
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Sean M. McDonough

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199576470

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199576470.001.0001

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‘In the Beginning, Lord…’: The Contribution of Hebrews

‘In the Beginning, Lord…’: The Contribution of Hebrews

Chapter:
(p.192) 9 ‘In the Beginning, Lord…’: The Contribution of Hebrews
Source:
Christ as Creator
Author(s):

Sean M. McDonough (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199576470.003.0009

Hebrews makes an important contribution to the understanding of Christ's role in creation. Despite its Hellenistic flavor, the epistle provides the clearest evidence in the New Testament that the doctrine of Jesus' agency of creation was seen as a direct consequence of his messianic status. The catena of quotations in chapter 1 draws heavily on classic messianic texts, and the remainder of the book illuminates Christ's priestly and covenantal work in light of the messianic psalms. As in Colossians, the creation motif serves primarily to reinforce the unquestionable superiority of Christ, though in Hebrews the emphasis lies on Christ as the definitive Word of God more than as the definitive ruler on God's behalf (though this is not of course excluded).

Keywords:   Christ, creation, messianic, Word, Hebrews, Hellenistic, priestly

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