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Soil Ecology and Ecosystem Services$
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Diana H. Wall, Richard D. Bardgett, Valerie Behan-Pelletier, Jeffrey E. Herrick, T. Hefin Jones, Karl Ritz, Johan Six, Donald R. Strong, and Wim H. van der Putten

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199575923

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199575923.001.0001

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Agroforestry and Soil Health: Linking Trees, Soil Biota, and Ecosystem Services

Agroforestry and Soil Health: Linking Trees, Soil Biota, and Ecosystem Services

Chapter:
(p.315) Chapter 5.2 Agroforestry and Soil Health: Linking Trees, Soil Biota, and Ecosystem Services
Source:
Soil Ecology and Ecosystem Services
Author(s):

Edmundo Barrios

Gudeta W. Sileshi

Keith Shepherd

Fergus Sinclair

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199575923.003.0028

Agricultural landscapes hold a large proportion of the world's biodiversity. Nevertheless, there is poor understanding of the contribution of agricultural management practices to conservation of biodiversity and soil functions that underpin the provision of soil-based ecosystem services. Evidence has shown a strong link between aboveground and belowground biodiversity, highlighting the impact of land use and management on the provision of soil-based ecosystem services. Agroforestry – the integration of trees into agricultural fields and landscapes – has the potential to facilitate the transition to multifunctional agriculture that successfully addresses the challenge of optimizing crop productivity while maintaining the provision of other ecosystem services. In order to realize this potential, however, there is considerable need for greater understanding of how to optimize tree–soil biota interactions that improve agroecosystem function and soil health.

Keywords:   agroforestry, ecological interactions, ecosystem services, functional diversity, soil health, soil biodiversity, soil monitoring, trees, tropical agriculture

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