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Emerging GiantsChina and India in the World Economy$
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Barry Eichengreen, Poonam Gupta, and Rajiv Kumar

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199575077

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199575077.001.0001

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Trading with Asia's Giants

Trading with Asia's Giants

Chapter:
(p.32) 2 Trading with Asia's Giants
Source:
Emerging Giants
Author(s):

Barry Bosworth

Susan M. Collins

Aaron Flaaen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199575077.003.0002

The United States' large and sustained trade deficit with Asia raises concerns in the United States about its competitiveness in the region. In contrast to the current public policy debate, which has focused on imports from Asia, this chapter seeks to examine how the economies of China and India compare as markets for US exporters. The chapter begins by noting that US exports to both countries do appear low relative to the performance of Japan and the EU-15. It examines potential explanations for the weak exports from three different perspectives: (1) the commodity composition of US exports to these economies; (2) the role of multinational corporations in facilitating trade flows; and (3) the use of ‘gravity equations’ to estimate bilateral trade patterns while controlling for a variety of country-specific characteristics.

Keywords:   China, India, United States, trade, exports

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