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Basil of Caesarea, Gregory of Nyssa, and the Transformation of Divine Simplicity
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Basil of Caesarea, Gregory of Nyssa, and the Transformation of Divine Simplicity

Andrew Radde-Gallwitz

Abstract

Divine simplicity is the idea that, as the ultimate principle of the universe, God must be a non‐composite unity not made up of parts or diverse attributes. The idea was appropriated by early Christian theologians from non‐Christian philosophy and played a pivotal role in the development of Christian thought. Andrew Radde‐Gallwitz charts the progress of the idea of divine simplicity from the second through the fourth centuries, with particular attention to Basil of Caesarea and Gregory of Nyssa, two of the most subtle writers on this topic, both instrumental in the construction of the Trinitar ... More

Keywords: Basil of Caesarea, Gregory of Nyssa, divine simplicity, theological epistemology, Eunomius of Cyzicus, Clement of Alexandria, divine attributes, Ptolemaeus Gnosticus, negative theology, propria

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2009 Print ISBN-13: 9780199574117
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199574117.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Andrew Radde-Gallwitz, author
Assistant Professor of Theology, Loyola University, Chicago
Author Webpage