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Jesus and the Chaos of HistoryRedirecting the Life of the Historical Jesus$
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James Crossley

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199570577

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199570577.001.0001

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Camping with Jesus?

Camping with Jesus?

Gender, Revolution, and Early Palestinian Tradition

Chapter:
(p.134) 5 Camping with Jesus?
Source:
Jesus and the Chaos of History
Author(s):

James G. Crossley

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199570577.003.0006

This chapter looks at the role and constructions of gender in the earliest Palestinian tradition. It looks at how the crucifixion and the threat of crucifixion led to potentially chaotic and contradictory perceptions of Jesus’ ‘manliness’. It further looks at the connections between social upheaval and shifting gender constructions in the earliest Palestinian tradition, including perceptions of activities outside the household and interaction between men and women, particularly in comparative ‘revolutionary’ contexts. Again, while gender assumptions may have been challenged and questioned, the earliest Palestinian tradition simultaneously constructed Jesus in ‘manly’ terms and attempted to impose normative gender assumptions. Nevertheless, the chaos of the earliest Palestinian tradition would play some role in the emergence of women as agents in the emergence of the earliest Christian movement.

Keywords:   Jesus and gender, Jesus and sexuality, crucifixion, historical change, gender and revolution

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