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John Henry NewmanA Biography$
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Ian Ker

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199569106

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199569106.001.0001

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Controversy and Satire

Controversy and Satire

Chapter:
(p.337) 8 Controversy and Satire
Source:
John Henry Newman
Author(s):

Ian Ker

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199569106.003.0008

It was becoming more obvious that John Henry Newman's overall authority was no longer acknowledged and that his view of the Oratory was specifically rejected. Newman concluded that there was a “similitude between the dead records of the past and the feverish chronicle of the present”. He asserted that the argument from analogy plays a continuous and crucial role in his critique of Anglo-Catholicism for identities are discovered and realities revealed through the recognition of analogies. The argument from analogy is deployed effectively and at length in ‘Mysteries of Nature and of Grace’ to show that the difficulties of belief in God are parallel to those of believing in the Catholic Church. Newman would later set up the English Congregation of the Oratory and admitted nine members “five priests, one novice, three lay brothers, and the St. Wilfrid's community. Immediately a problem arose” a foretaste of things to come.

Keywords:   John Henry Newman, Oratory, Anglo-Catholicism, Catholic Church, converts

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