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The Early Text of the New Testament$
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Charles E. Hill and Michael J. Kruger

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199566365

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199566365.001.0001

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The Early Text of Luke

The Early Text of Luke

Chapter:
(p.121) 7 The Early Text of Luke
Source:
The Early Text of the New Testament
Author(s):

Juan Hernández

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199566365.003.0008

This chapter examines six pre-fourth-century papyri containing Luke’s Gospel: P4, P7, P45, P69, P75, and P111. The individual scribal habits, textual relationships, and transmission and social histories of each manuscript are considered. Editorial features — including nomina sacra, numerical abbreviations, and the presence or absence of ekthesis, paragraphos, and medial points — are noted and compared. Attention is also paid to the manuscript’s use (public or private) and production setting (controlled or uncontrolled). The relationship between each manuscript’s scribal habits and textual relationships receives sustained attention, particularly in the case of P75. The close textual alignment between Luke-P45 and the chief Alexandrian witnesses (P75-B-א) is also demonstrated for the first time in the literature.

Keywords:   Gospel of Luke, scribal habits, New Testament textual criticism, P45, P75, Western non-interpolations, New Testament papyri

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