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Freudian MythologiesGreek Tragedy and Modern Identities$
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Rachel Bowlby

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199566228

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199566228.001.0001

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A Freudian Curiosity

A Freudian Curiosity

Chapter:
(p.124) 5 A Freudian Curiosity
Source:
Freudian Mythologies
Author(s):

RACHEL BOWLBY

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199566228.003.0006

This chapter involves detailed readings of what Freud says about children's early questions about what they do not yet know as sexuality: Where do babies come from? What is the difference between boys and girls? What is it that married people do together? There are some variations and inconsistencies in his view of which of these questions comes first, and this in turn is related to the development of his own theories or myths of sexual difference. Further, Freud assumes in children a curiosity which is always ultimately a sexual curiosity: sexual questions are the spur to and prototype of all research, and the theories or myths that children formulate to answer them are early versions of later scientific ones, including Freud's own.

Keywords:   sexual difference, sexuality, children's sexual theories, curiosity, Freud

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