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Risk Communication and Public Health$
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Peter Bennett, Kenneth Calman, Sarah Curtis, and Denis Fischbacher-Smith

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199562848

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199562848.001.0001

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Contesting the Science: Public Health Knowledge and Action in Controversial Land-Use Developments

Contesting the Science: Public Health Knowledge and Action in Controversial Land-Use Developments

Chapter:
(p.181) Chapter 12 Contesting the Science: Public Health Knowledge and Action in Controversial Land-Use Developments
Source:
Risk Communication and Public Health
Author(s):

Eva Elliott

Emily Harrop

Gareth H. Williams

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199562848.003.12

This chapter explores two different forms of public protest against land developments that were considered by local people to threaten public health. They diverged in terms of their means of struggle and in the different opportunity structures open to them. In the first example, a protest group, known as ‘Rhondda Against Nanty-y-Gwyddon Tip’ or RANT, came to pursue an oppositional course in their struggle to close and make safe a local landfill site. In the second, local residents used the process of a health impact assessment (HIA), through a university-based HIA support unit and the national public health service for Wales, to present evidence on possible risks to public health in an appeal against an application to extend an opencast mine.

Keywords:   public health, public protest, land use, Nanty-y-Gwyddon Tip, health impact assessment

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