Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Quantifying the Roman EconomyMethods and Problems$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Alan Bowman and Andrew Wilson

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199562596

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199562596.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 19 November 2017

Quantifying the Roman Economy: Integration, Growth, Decline?

Quantifying the Roman Economy: Integration, Growth, Decline?

Chapter:
(p.3) 1 Quantifying the Roman Economy: Integration, Growth, Decline?
Source:
Quantifying the Roman Economy
Author(s):

Alan Bowman (Contributor Webpage)

Andrew Wilson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199562596.003.0001

This chapter discusses the definitions and characteristics of the economic processes and trends in the Roman Empire, and outlines the methods by which quantification of data in written and archaeological sources can lead to a better understanding of economic integration, growth, and decline in the period c.100 BC to AD 350. These are then further analyzed in the context of a number of economic institutions and practices, including economic policy, monetization, trade, markets, commerce, investment, industrial production, technology, specialization of the labour force, and education. It suggests how we can identify a series of indicators of trends, which may be different in different regions, that can yield an idea of how the Roman economy compares with earlier and later periods of the classical world and with other cultures and empires.

Keywords:   Roman Empire, quantification, economic policy, monetization, trade, markets, commerce, investment, technology, labour

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .