Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Remaking Global OrderThe Evolution of Europe-China Relations and its Implications for East Asia and the United States$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Nicola Casarini

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199560073

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199560073.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 March 2019

The EU and East Asia's Strategic Balance

The EU and East Asia's Strategic Balance

Chapter:
(p.145) 7 The EU and East Asia's Strategic Balance
Source:
Remaking Global Order
Author(s):

Nicola Casarini

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199560073.003.0008

This chapter traces the process leading to the emergence of changing perceptions of the EU in East Asia following the establishment of an EU—China techno‐political linkage and the proposal to lift the EU arms embargo on China. The first part examines Europe's traditional involvement in East Asian security affairs, including the Taiwan question and cross‐Strait relations. In the second part, this chapter analyses the novelty represented by the promotion of EU space and defence interests in China, including its impact on a regional environment characterized by the security dilemma and balance of power logic. This chapter concludes with a discussion on whether, and to what extent, the promotion of EU space and defence interests in China coupled with the peculiar characteristics of East Asia's international system has made the EU to be perceived as a novel strategic factor in the region.

Keywords:   EU Asia policy, involvement, Taiwan, cross‐Strait relations, Japan, United States, China, balance of power, perceptions, regional security

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .