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Manuscript Verse Collectors and the Politics of Anti-Courtly Love Poetry$
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Joshua Eckhardt

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199559503

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199559503.001.0001

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The Politics of Courtly and Anti‐Courtly Love Poetry in the Hands of Collectors

The Politics of Courtly and Anti‐Courtly Love Poetry in the Hands of Collectors

Chapter:
(p.33) 2 The Politics of Courtly and Anti‐Courtly Love Poetry in the Hands of Collectors
Source:
Manuscript Verse Collectors and the Politics of Anti-Courtly Love Poetry
Author(s):

Joshua Eckhardt

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199559503.003.0002

The second chapter analyzes four manuscript verse miscellanies whose compilers each constructed a striking relationship between John Donne and Sir Walter Ralegh. Yet, as the chapter ultimately demonstrates, no two collectors constructed this relationship in quite the same way. The compilers of certain miscellanies presented Donne's Ovidian love elegy, “To his Mistress going to bed,” as something of an answer-poem to Ralegh. In the manuscript environments that they produced, Donne seems to mock Ralegh's poetry and politics. A collector responsible for other manuscripts, however, found Ralegh and Donne to be perfectly compatible, presenting them as exemplary authors of complementary love poems.

Keywords:   Ralegh, Donne, Elizabeth I, love elegy, lyric, libel

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